Schofield-Waikane Trail

Trail in Ewa Forest Reserve (Poamoho Section)

Overview

  • Directions

    Geolocation is not allowed
  • Distance

    3.65 miles

Contact Information

Description

Details

Length (one way): 4 mi / 6.44 km - Elevation Change: 700 ft / 213.36 m

General Summary:

Schofield-Waikane Trail is a 7 mile ridge trail into the Ko'olau mountains culminating in views of the windward side of the island.

For additional information refer to the "Route description" section below.

Allowed Activities
Hiking
Rules & Regulation
Stay On Trail
Dogs On Leash
Allowed Access
Pedestrians
Bicycles
Dogs
Horses

Additional Information

Mountain Bikers

Always yield to hikers. Do not slide around corners or slide down the trail. Careless mountain biking damages the trail and causes erosion. If accidents are reported or damage to the trail is extreme, the trail may be closed to mountain bikers. This trail is not an easy mountain bike trail.

Special Conditions

Access Permit Requirements and Restrictions
1. Written permission for access through Schofield East Range is required from The U.S. Army, Director of Public Works (DPW). Please fax or write a letter of request explaining purpose, date and group size to:
US Army Garrison, Hawaii,
Director of Public Works
ATTN: Real Estate Section
Scholfield Barracks 96857
Or Fax 808-656-3290

Do not use any trail or access road that is not delineated by name and color and that may also be displayed on these maps. The marked features are managed for public recreational use. Other trails or roads that branch off from the public features may be on private property, and are not managed for any public recreational use. Access is subject to adjacent landowner approval, and if used without authorization, you will be trespassing and possibly putting yourself at risk.
Downloadable resources are provided below

Activities

  • Pedestrian

Features

  • Nature Study
  • Scenic Viewpoint

Hazards

  • Dangerous Cliff
  • Dangerous Footing

Dog Owners

Hunting may be in progress on or near this hiking trail. Hunting dogs may be off-leash while engaged in the hunt. Hikers must keep their dogs leashed at all times and remove dog waste while on this trail.

Plants/Birds

For the most part the trail winds through magnificent native rain forest dominated by `ohi`a and koa trees. `Ohi`a has oval leaves and clusters of delicate red, yellow, or orange flowers. Early Hawaiians used the flowers in lei (garlands) and the wood in outrigger canoes. The hard, durable wood was also carved into god images for heiau (religious sites). Koa has sickle-shaped foliage and pale yellow flower clusters. Early Hawaiians made surfboards and outrigger canoe hulls out of the beautiful red brown wood. Today it is made into fine furniture. In the understory is kopiko, a native member of the coffee family. The small tree has leathery, oblong leaves with a light green midrib. Turn the leaf over to see a row of tiny holes (piko [navel]) on either side of the midrib. The kopiko produces clusters of little white flowers and fleshy, orange fruits. In the forest canopy watch for the `amakihi, the most common native forest bird on O`ahu. It is yellowish green with a slightly curved gray bill and feeds on nectar, fruits, and insects. If the `ohi`a are in bloom, you may glimpse the scarce `apapane. It has a red breast and head, black wings and tail, and a slightly curved black bill. In flight the `apapane makes a whirring sound as it darts from tree to tree searching for insects and nectar. As the vegetation opens up, look for the native loulu palm. It has rigid, fan-shaped fronds in a cluster at the top of a ringed trunk. Early Hawaiians used the fronds for thatch and plaited the blades of young fronds into fans and baskets. Also along the open ridge is the native `olapa tree. Its leaves are opposite, oblong and flutter in the slightest wind. In a special hula stance named after the tree, dancers mimic the exquisite movements of the leaves. Early Hawaiians used the bark, leaves, and purple fruit to make a blue black dye to decorate their kapa (bark cloth). On the final stretch look closely for the native shrub `ohelo. It has rounded, toothed leaves and delicious red berries, about the size of blueberries. According to legend, `ohelo is sacred to Pele, goddess of fire. She changed her dead sister, Ka`ohelo, into the shrub and named it after her.

History

The Schofield-Waikane Trail started out as a plantation ditch trail and then became an Army route connecting Schofield Barracks with the windward side. In 1900, Waialua Agricultural Company built the initial section along the ridge to gain access to the intake of the Mauka Ditch along Kaukonahua Stream. The Army extended the trail to the Ko`olau Summit in 1912 and built the windward Waikane section in 1923. The wide, graded path was suitable for horses and mules. In the mid 1930s, the Civilian Conservation Corps reconstructed deteriorated sections of the Army route.

Terrain and Trail Environment

Mountainous. Dense, native forest

Simple Trail Tips

  1. Stay on the trail. 
  2. Check the weather 
  3. Watch the time 
  4. Avoid undue risk 
  5. Read all posted signs 
  6. Respect other trail users 
  7. Pack out at least what you pack in.

Route Description

Schofield-Waikane Trail begins in native forest and continues up along a ridge to the Ko‘olau Summit. This trail offers spectacular views of the Waianae mountains and, from the summit, the windward side of O‘ahu. This trail only receives periodic maintenance and is not suitable for novice hikers. Plants found along this trail include koa, o‘hia, naupaka and lobelia.

Descriptions for route, history, plants and birds were provided by Stuart Ball, author of The Hikers Guide to Oahu and other hiking books.

Directions

Schofield-Waikane Trail begins in native forest and continues up along a ridge to the Ko‘olau Summit. This trail offers spectacular views of the Waianae mountains and, from the summit, the windward side of O‘ahu. This trail only receives periodic maintenance and is not suitable for novice hikers. Plants found along this trail include koa, o‘hia, naupaka and lobelia.

Descriptions for route, history, plants and birds were provided by Stuart Ball, author of The Hikers Guide to Oahu and other hiking books.